The 8 Planets – Part 8: Neptune

LAST STOP: NEPTUNE!

Neptune

Neptune

The last planet Neptune, is quite a spectacle, essentially a blue marble. As with Uranus, methane (trace amount) gives Neptune its blue coloration. Named after the Roman god of the seas Neptune was noted by Galileo in 1612, but discovered as a planet by Urbain Le Vernier, John Couch Adams and Johann Galle on September 23, 1846. Neptune has a very elliptical orbit, and was further than Pluto between 1979 and 1999. Uranus and Neptune are usually paired together as “ice giants.” Uranus is light blue, named after the god of the sky, while Neptune is dark blue, named after the god of the seas. Unlike Uranus’s bland surfaces, Neptune’s ephemeral storms make up the planet’s active atmosphere. The Great Dark Spot is comparable to Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, but the Great Dark Spot comes and goes. With the strongest gales in the solar system, winds (rotates opposite of the planet’s rotation direction) on Neptune have speeds up to 2,100 kph— almost reaching supersonic flow! Winds called the scooter that speed across Neptune reach up to 3000 kph! Although Neptune’s atmosphere is one of the coldest places of the solar system, Neptune has a faint, fragmented ring system called arcs discovered during the 1960s and confirmed during the 1989. The rings give off a faint red hue, comprising mainly of ice and carbon-based materials. Like that of Uranus, Neptune’s magnetosphere is also relatively tilted (47º). The pressure on Neptune is so great that it rains diamonds there! On Neptune, that pole facing the Sun is 10ºC hotter than the other pole, so when the seasons change, frozen methane warm up and leak out into space.

MOONS

Triton and Nereid

Triton and Nereid

Neptune has 13 known moons, the largest are Triton and Nereid. In mythology, Triton and Nereid are Neptune’s sons. Interestingly, Triton has a retrograde orbit (spins east to west), which suggests the Neptune gravitationally pulled Triton into its orbit. In fact, in 3.6 million years, Neptune will pull Triton past the Roche Limit (past this limit, all moons are doomed to crash into the planet), and the moon will crash into Neptune! Neptune’s second largest natural satellite, Nereid, an irregular moon, has one of the most eccentric (elliptical) orbits in the solar system.

MISSIONS: Voyager 2

OVERVIEW

  • Order in Solar System: #8
  • Number of Moons: 13
  • Orbital Period: 164.8 years
  • Rotational Period: 16.11 hours
  • Mass: 1.0243 x 10^26 kg ( 17.147 Earths)
  • Volume: 6.254 x 10 ^13 km³ (57.74 Earths)
  • Radius: 24,764 km (3.883 Earths)
  • Surface Area: 7.6183 x 10^9 km² (14.98 Earths)
  • Density: 1.638 g/cm³
  • Eccentricity of Orbit: 0.0112
  • Surface Temperature (Average): 72 K
  • Escape Velocity: 23.5 km/s
  • Apparent Magnitude: 8.02 to 7.78
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