Age of Earth and Age of the Universe

How do scientists determine the ages of the Earth and the Universe? –Peyami

Earth

Age of Earth

Planet Earth is approximately 4.54 billion years old. But how did scientists determine this? With the radiometric dating of meteorites and the ages of the oldest known minerals. While the oldest meteorites found on Earth are approximately 4.5 billion years old, the oldest known mineral, zircon, discovered by Jack Hills in Australia is at least 4.4 billion years old. One meteorite used was the Canyon Diablo meteorite (4.55 billion years old) aged by C. C. Patterson. Since most of Earth’s minerals have undergone change in the core, mantle, and crust by plate tectonics, weathering, and hydrothermal circulation (circulation of hot water), scientists usually cannot use them in dating Earth. However, scientists used ancient Archaean lead ores of galena (natural mineral form of lead II sulfide), the earliest formed homogenous lead isotope, which very precisely dated Earth at 4.54 billion years. Furthermore, inclusions rich in calcium and aluminum in meteorites were formed within the solar system about 4.567 billion years age. As the oldest known solid component of meteorites, these Ca-Al inclusions determine the age of the solar system and set the upper limit of the age of Earth. Scientists do not known the time of Earth’s accretion (growth by gravitationally attracting more matter), but believe it started some after the Ca-Al inclusions formed.

In fact, scientists have long debated over and calculated the age of Earth. People had estimated Earth at just hundred of thousands of years! Later, scientists extended their estimates with more evidence. However, it wasn’t until Charles Darwin, who proposed the theory of natural evolution, that scientists began to make closer estimates. Using the molecular clock and the rate of genetic divergence, scientists estimate the last universal ancestor of all organisms at 3.5-3.8 billion years old.

Expansion of the Universe

Age of the Universe

The age of the Universe is 13.75 billion years old. People long thought the Universe as much younger— millions, let alone billion of years old. Edwin Hubble’s observations in the 1920s showed that the Universe has a finite age. Using Doppler Shift, Hubble discovered that the Universe was expanding. Every galaxy seemed to be moving away from each other, showing red shifts in their spectral lines. In 1958, Allan Sandage made the first calculation of a value called the Hubble’s constant, which determines the rate of the Universe’s expansion. With the Hubble’s constant, Sandage made the first accurate (closer than before) estimate of the age of the Universe at ~20 billion years. Discovered in 1965, the microwave cosmic background radiation, a remnant of the Big Bang, confirmed the expanding Universe theory. As the Universe expanded, it gradually cooled. The CBR shows the Universe at 2.7 K. In fact, scientists have recently discovered dark energy. Dark energy accelerates the expansion of the Universe, reducing earlier estimates of >14 billion years to 13.75 billion years.

Graph of Expansion: Expansion is Accelerating!

Meteroite Dating

How do scientists determine the age of meteorites, most of which are around 4.5 billion years old. –Amy

Meteorite

Meteorite Dating

Scientists measure the age of meteorites with the decay of radioactive isotopes. What is an isotope? Isotopes are elements with the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. For instance, carbon-12 has 6 neutrons and carbon-14 has 8 neutrons. Some isotopes are very unstable and tend to decay into lighter elements by alpha or beta particle decay. Scientists use the half-life of certain elements to date objects. First, scientists must determine to isotope to use by examining the elemental composition of the object. For meteorites, scientists generally use Rubidium-87/ Strontium-87 decay, which has a half-life of 49 billion years. Rubidium-87 decays into Strontium-87. So if the object has 50% Rubidium-87 and 50% Strontium-87  (only formed by decay process), then the object is 49 million years old. Since some Strontium-87 may have been present originally, scientists use Strontium-86, whose content remains the same, as a reference. Determining the ratio between Rubidium-87/ Strontium-86 and Strontium-87/ Strontium-86 via mass spectrometer (vaporizes a tiny portion of the meteorite to form ions; the ions are then separated by mass in a magnetic field), scientists can then calculate the amount of each isotope present in the meteorite, and thus the age of meteorites. Although radioactive dating is the best method for scientists to date meteorites, many factors, such as the amount of sunshine or heavy rain, can affect measurements.